Microsoft Issues DMCA Notices Against BBC, CBS, CNN, Wikipedia And The US Government

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act has been created to protect the copyrights of digital property. If anyone infringes the copyright, the copyright holder company can ask search engines including Google and their hosting companies to take down the intellectual property including copied content, images etc.

Microsoft has accidently asked Google to take down links from their search results of very popular websites including BBC, CBS, CNN, Wikipedia and even the US Government websites.

DMCA Notice
Image credit: wikipedia.org

According to ReadWriteWeb, Microsoft makes copyright infringement claims for Office 2010 (587 links), Office 2007 (155 links), Windows 8 beta (66 links), Office 2013 (33 links), as well as many more, including for software as well as Xbox 360 video games. The slipup seems to be in the Windows 8 beta claim section; at least 27 of the 66 links seem to be laughably legitimate and appear to be targeted simply because they reference the number 45.

The full Microsoft DMCA copyright complaint to Google can be accessed from here or here. While Google seems to be aware of this faulty situation, some of the links from popular websites like Wikipedia and BBC have been whitelisted and are re-appearing in Google searches but smaller sites will have to fight hard to get their links back into the search results.

Not long ago, Ghacks also reported about the DMCA notices being sent to technology sites by Microsoft. Technize.net also got hit by one of the Microsoft DMCA notices. And interestingly, the link in the notice had nothing to do with Microsoft. It was a tag page without any images and only one page linking in the tag page.

While this may seem a funny situation, a large number of DMCA notices from Microsoft to millions of webpages on the Internet are becoming a big concern for webmasters as they can’t verify each of their pages against the claims. The only way to avoid this will be to punish the false DMCA complaints as mentioned by Torrentfreak.